The Goldonian

Summer 1959

Inter-House Boxing
A NIGHT TO REMEMBER
After many snags and obstacles, particularly "flu", we managed to stage our annual boxing finals on Monday and Tuesday, 16th, 17th March.
We all enjoyed the event, particularly on the Tuesday when the evening was really made with the arrival of our guest of honour, Mr. Freddie
Mills, who really stimulated the boxers by his wonderful personality.
We usually spread the finals over three nights, but as Freddie Mills could only make the Tuesday we squeezed the finals into two nights which
meant boxing twenty-four bouts each evening, a lot by any standard, and I should like to thank the officials and boxers who helped to make the
finals efficient and "slick", particularly the boys who had to box twice in one evening.
Monday gave us a good start with Kinnaird House boxing Pelham and Buxton Houses in the junior division. Cairns boxed Aberdeen in the
senior division. On Tuesday evening the atmosphere was tense with excitement and anticipation; the points were running close, so close in fact
that the very last bout of the evening between Bacon and Copping decided the senior placing, and a grand contest it was too.
The old faithfuls were well to the fore with Robert Watkins again being chosen as "Boxer of the Year" for the third year in succession and this
time chosen by Freddie; Mills. Bacon boxed well and was this year awarded his colours. M. Palmer, who boxes well but found difficulty finding
good opposition, was never allowed to show his best. A. Knight was the "dark horse" of the senior division and put up a creditable
performance in both bouts.
The juniors have some talent which should show better next year, particularly Sainsbury, Holberry and Browning.
RESULTS
SENIOR

Cairns, - 52. Somerset, - 50. Aberdeen, - 48.
JUNIOR
Buxton , - 48. Pelham, - 42. Kinnaird. - 34.
R.N.

The Royal Life Saving Society
A very important lesson was learned this year by both students and spectators at the examination of the lads who entered for the R.L.S. Bronze
Medal and Intermediate Life Saving awards.
Considering the many hours of swimming that is permitted each year there are very few really competent swimmers in the School, that is to
say boys who can swim a thousand yards or more. Far too much time is spent diving from one side of the bath to the other and as we saw during
the water tests most boys had difficulty in pulling a willing subject two-thirds of the length of the bath. Imagine the problem of attempting the
rescue of an unwilling, struggling subject who could weigh anything up to fourteen or fifteen stone!
Nevertheless I am sure we all learnt something and even the chaps who failed have not wasted their time and should make it next year.
Twentysix boys took the artificial respiration award and passed. Three passed the Bronze Medalion and four passed the Intermediate Certificate.
BRONZE MEDAL: M. Justice, A. Logan, P. Snowdon. INTERMEDIATE CERTIFICATE: B. Ivy, J. Beattie, P. Randall, S. Braken.
R. N.
N.B. I am delighted to be able to report that Mr. Newton has now qualified as a Life Saving and Swimming Examiner.
ED.

Senior Boys' Cricket
The season opened with a disappointment when our first fixture v. Bushev Grammar School was cancelled because of wet weather. However,
our first match with Nazeing Colts was a good testing piece for our team, and although we lost, it was a good game and allowed us to gel
The feel of our bowling, batting and fielding match condition.
Our next match v. Hertford Grammer School proved a much more balanced affair, and although we lost, it was by a much smaller margin, and
it almost became a last man win. Our bowlers were on form and provided a number of lucky escapes for the opposition. As usual with twenty
over matches, our team went out to bat for runs and the emergency to score quickly caused the fall of some easy wickets.
The team's following game v. Hatfield Hyde Colts proved to be a classic. Fielding was keen, bowling consistent and in the words of a Hatfield
Hyde player "continually baffling". Turning point of the game came when Isaac Mohammed (capt.) threw himself horizontally in the outfield to
catch a ball, literally with his fingertips; from then on W.B.T.S. were after wickets, and even the two Hatfield Hyde, first eleven players in the
team fell early victims to this determined opposition.
Our batting was equally as keen, and never shall we forget those two sixes hit by Chris Mitchell during his splendid innings of twenty-seven
runs; he played every stroke with vigour, and was ably supported at the other end by Chris Alsemgeest with a forceful play total of sixteen.
Our last match to date, a return game v. Nazeing Colts, shows that we have finally struck our best form. They were fielding a weaker side this
time, but nevertheless their opening batsmen made a promising start. A poor wicket and excellent bowling from Michael Smith-Kerr and Chris
Alsemgeest, closed their innings finally for thirty-one runs.
Ignoring the bumpy pitch our batsmen opened their shoulders straight away, and in a few overs Nazeing's score had been overtaken to give us
a win. "Broody" Hammond was in cracking form and drove the long balls out on both sides of the field, his final total of thirty-seven runs was
a victory in itself, and with longer play, who knows, he may have earned his bat with a fifty.
Many other feats and persons could be named, but perhaps at the end of the season we shall have a longer and more detailed account to give.
However, with the present standard of play in our team, lost matches will not be the result of lack of effort and enthusiasm, but rather of over
stiff opposition.
F.S. S.

Staff Cricket XI, 1959
So far the Staff XI have played 12 games, won 8, and lost 4. Most of the matches have been played in glorious weather, a phenomenon of
which the batsmen look lull advantage.
Once again we have had a few individual achievements; Mr. Tordoff's century against Allenbury's, Dr. Jory, whom we welcome to Golding's
cricket, has excelled behind the wicket on two occasions, and hit a neat 86 not out against our old rivals Ferme Park. It has been nice to have
Mr. Steele playing again on his frequent visits and doing well with both bat and ball.
We cannot pass without mention of the stalwart bowling of Mr. Wheatley, J. James, and M. Maxim, and the general high standard of fielding
and sportsmanship throughout. In our last match both M. Maxim and T. Burgar held catches off their own bowling which were both out of this
world, particularly the one by Michael who dived full length to take the ball one-handed.
MATCHES AND RESULTS :
Hatfield Hyde (H) won; Goldings 113—86 Batting: Stevenson, 39; Nicholson, 13 n.o. Bowling: Wheatley, 4 for 20; Burgar, 3 for 22.
London Transport (H) won; Goldings 75—59 Batting: Embleton, 14; Maxim, 14. Bowling: James 4 for a 11.
Allenbury's (A) won; Goldings 192—66 Batting: Tordoff, 105; James, 13. Bowling: James, 7 for 25; Steele, 3 for 30.
"57" Club (H) won; Goldings 82-7—67 Batting: Wilkins, 30; Embleton, 18 n.o. Bowling: Smith-Kerr, 5 for 25; Embleton, 3 for 5.
Queen's College (H) lost; Goldings 99—113 Batting: Steele, 21; Burgar, 20. Bowling: James, 4 for 34; Maxim, 4 for 38.
Ferme Park (H) won; Go
ldings 199—95 Batting: Jory, 86 n.o.; Tordoff, 29; Embleton, 27; Burgar, 24.
Bowling: Maxim, 3 for 39; Burgar, 2 for 13; Steele 2 for 18.
Northmet (H) won; Goldings 106-6—93 Batting: Tordoff, 32 n.o.; Allen, 24; Burgar, 20.
Bowling: Smith-Kerr 6 for 32; Embleton, 3 for 21.
Wormley (Fuller Cupi) (H) lost; Goldings 62—64 Batting: Burgar, 16. Bowling: Anstey, 7 for 22; Maxim, 3 for 32.
Stepney Staff (A) won; Goldings 53-5—45 Batting: Tordoff, 23 n.o.; Steele, 16. Bowling: Maxim, 3 for 6; Steele, 4 for 24.
Allenbury's (H) lost; Goldings 60—192-7 dec. Batting: Wheatley, 16; Embleton, 12; Stevenson, 11, Bowling: (Allenbury's) Davison, 3 for 46.
Goldings Old Boys' (H) won; Goldings Staff 136-3 dec.—75 Batting: Tordoff, 58 n o.; Jory, 46. Bowling: Wheatley, 5 for 32; Jory, 3 for 8.
John Innes Institute (A) lost; Goldings 56-5—57-5 Batting: Embleton, 16; Wheatley, 15 n.o.
CATCHES: Nicholson 6; Burgar 5; Stevenson 3; Embleton 3; Tordoff 2 catches, 7 stumpings.

East Herts Youth Football Association
At Brookfield Lane, Cheshunt, the football ground belonging to Cheshunt F.C. was loaned to stage the East Herts, Youth F,A, (under 18) League
Challenge Cup Final. Our team arrived to meet the high-scoring, all conquering St. George's Boys' Club Performances of the two sides
throughout the season were such that the School supporters hoped for not too high a score against us. From the kick-off it was apparent that
our boys were out to give of their very best and on that evening's performance they earned out admiration. St. George's scored the goal that
Mattered but the game could have gone the other way. We who watched were very proud of the School team.
At a League meeting on 12th May, many clubs supported the idea of resorting to two leagues only next Season, as it was felt the present
constitution of the sections had not proved very successful. We hope therefore, that next year will provide our boys with more games and a.
subsequent greater interest.

FINAL TABLES
Under 16—Section A
Barclavians (Stevenage)
W.B.T.S
Stanstead Abbotts
Stapleford

Under 16—Section B
St. 'George's Boys' Club
Broxbourne Swifts
Kings United
Cheshunt Boys' Club
Waltham Abbey
Lockfield

Under 18 — Section A
Herts Trainin
W.B.T.S.
Bayley Boys' Club
Nazeing
llaileybury Boys' Club

Under 18—Section B
St. George's Boys' Club
Waltham Abbey
Cheshunt Boys' Club
Lockfield United
Broxbo'urne Swifts :
Suffolks
Cheshunt St. Mary's

P
6
6
6
6

W
4
4
2
0

D
1
1
2
0

L
1
1
2
6

F
27
20
27
7

A
7
13
17
44

Pts
9
9
6
0

Goals


10
10
10
10
10
10


9
7
6
2
2
1


1
2
1
1
0
1


0
1
3
7
8
8


65
61
33
18
28
23


9
24
29
54
54
58


19
16
13
5
4
3

8
8
8
8
8

7
6
3
2
1

0
0
1
0
1

1
2
4
6
6

60
60
21
10
24

12
19
57
51
36

14
12
7
4
3

12
12
12
12
12
12
12

11
8
7
6
4
2
1

1
0
0
1
3
1
0

0
4
5
5
5
9
11

83
70
82
47
40
15
12

11
26
37
32
48
93
102

23
16
14
13
11
5
2

Library Notes
Are you a slave to television? II certainly appears so judging from the number of boys who borrowed books from the library last term! There is
no harm in this medium, but watched too much I feel T.V. can do more harm than good. It tends to make one slow in thinking and as educational
programmes are few and far between during the evening not a lot can be learned. Since this new idol arrived about Christmas, five or so boys a
week have taken advantage of the reading material available.
If there is no improvement next term the library might as well be turned into a rest room; there will be more satisfaction!
One boy suggested that we have a comic lending library— sorry, this cannot be as the place would be crowded!
CHRIS PETTMAN, Librarian
LITERARY SECTION
Reprint from the first "Goldonian"
The Rev. F. C. Macdonald who was Governor of our School in 1927, has very kindly given me permission to reproduce his letter to the Editor
of the first edition of THE GOLDONIAN ever published:
"1st March, 1927" "Dear Mr. Editor,
"It is with much pleasure I have heard of your project to produce a monthly magazine for the School. I have been very proud of the supplement
for which you and your committee have been responsible in the Guild Messenger, and, judging from the quality of that, I am certain this bigger
venture will prove successful. It will be a great gain for us to have an organ of mutual communication in our School life. First of all, I think it
will be a bond of comradeship, for it will be a tangible expression of our common life and interests. It will, therefore, make for solidarity, for
your readers will realise they are not merely isolated units, but members of a family, all striving for the same end.
"Secondly, the magazine will be a record of achievement. Month by month, by means of the printed page, we shall be able to visualise the
varied activities of our community in work and play. Outstanding events will be more than of passing interest; they will become permanent
impressions. In this respect the magazine should have a most stimulating effect. It will prevent the tendency to regard sectional interests as of
paramount importance, and will provide a balanced review of the activities of our corporate life as a whole.
"Lastly, the magazine will give scope for the development of self expression, in the form of writing, to a large number of boys who have had
little opportunity for such work. The night school classes have revealed how great is our need in this respect. Thoughts are continually passing
in the minds of all, but me many boys lack the power to express them. The articles and letters which you will receive will be efforts to reproduce
thought in concrete terms, and your contributors will find by practice that facility of expression, though seemingly impossible at first, is
attainable in some measure by all, and when obtained, is one of the most useful gifts bestowed to man.
"With all my heart I wish your venture every success. Your motto suggests that the end crowns the work. You are at the beginning of your
effort; the end is in the mists of the future, but there is no doubt whatever that in this particular work, its ultimate completion, both to readers
and contributors, will be realized as a coronet of success".
Production of "The Goldonian"
Perhaps the following contribution to the School Magazine will induce in its readers more pride in its possession. To the printer, the sight of
his work fluttering about odd corners of the grounds is very frustrating indeed.
To produce your Magazine to coincide with the holidays is an ulcer-forming occupation for the Editor. Repeated appeals for copy bring little
response and as publication date draws near he frantically searches for material.
All material handed to a printer for reproduction is known as "copy". When copy is handed to the Editor his responsibility is to check it for
grammatical and factual correctness. Once edited, the copy is passed through the composing room, to be entered on to a work ticket. From there
it is handed to the mechanical type-setting department to be set-up into type. In this department there are two methods of setting type—by
Linotype or Monotype. THE GOLDONIAN is set on Linotype machines. The copy is placed conveniently in front of the operator who then
depresses keys in much the same manner as a typist. The depressed keys release brass matrices (small moulds) which assemble in a line.
Between words steel wedges are placed. The completed line of matrices and spaces is then automatically transferred to face a steel mould. The
wedge-shaped spaces then justify the line (ensuring each line of type is the same length by increasing space between words). Once justified a
molten alloy (lead, tin and antimony) is pumped through the steel mould into the line of matrices and solidifies upon contact. The complete line
of type is then ejected from the mould and all the matrices are returned to (lie magazine which houses them. The output from a Linotype depends
upon the skill of the operator; a skilled operator produces four lines of THE GOLDONIAN in one minute.
Once the type is set, it is handed to the hand composing department. First the type is locked into a tray (known as a galley); it is placed upon a
hand press, the surface inked, paper laid on the inked surface and a cylinder causes an impression to be transferred to the paper.
The original copy and the proof of the type are then handed to a reader, who checks one against the other for errors. Each line of type being a
solid, any error within a line means the resetting of that line by the Linotype operator. Once the corrections have been made, a further proof is
checked by the reader.
Should photographs be accepted for reproduction, these are sent to a firm of process engravers, who produce a?, plate known as a half-tone block.
This plate, quite briefly, is a metal surface made up of minute dots. The dots vary in size according to the densities of the tonal values of the
picture.
Once all the material has been read and the half-tones inserted, final galley proofs are given to the Editor who cuts them into pages and makes
up a dummy copy. The hand compositor then follows this, dummy, breaking the galleys of type into pages, inserting headings and page numbers.
Each page is bound with twine (page-cord).
The pages are then laid out on the stone (a heavy metal table) according to an imposition scheme. THE GOLDONIAN is printed eight pages at a
time and the eight pages have to be imposed (locked into a frame) in such a way that when printed and backed up (a further eight pages printed
on the reverse side of the paper) the finished sheet can be folded to produce a sixteen-page section.
The frames of pages (known as type-formes) contain spacing material between pages which determine the margin surrounding the pages.
The type-forme then becomes the responsibility of the machine-minder. He places the forme on to the bed of his printing press and locks it in
position. Having adjusted guides to ensure the pages print centrally on the paper it is his duty to make ready his impression cylinder. The
printing surface is not perfect and to bring about perfection the machine-minder builds up and cuts away packing on the impression cylinder.
Whilst he is doing this the printed sheet is being finally checked and is passed for press.
Once all the pages are printed, the various sections arc folded and then collated. The magazines are then guillotined to dispose of the folds,
inserted within covers, and finally wire-stitched.
The invention of printing from movable types in the fifteenth century I rate as one of the wonders of the world, for it opened the way to
education for the masses of people who otherwise would have remained illiterate. Even today there are millions who cannot read, millions who
do not possess one book. So do not throw away (his Magazine. If you do not wish to keep it, pass it on, to a friend outside the School.
Cool for Cats (2)
Hi there. Once again we are off on another cool session of your very own article—so let's go!
What a crazy gone few months these have been. The hit parade has changed like the weather. We've had Russ Conway's "Side Saddle", a party
piece that somehow topped the charts for four consecutive weeks. The late Buddy Holly's "Doesn't Matter Anymore", a rock come ballad, but a
very nice number. A great pity Muddy can't be around to take the credit for this one. The Platters with Jerome Kern's "Smoke gets in your eyes",
topped both sides of the Atlantic, although over here it only made a brief stay for one week in the coveted position, it was a fine disc worthy of
the place.
Newcomer Anthony New Icy looks like Britain's best bet. Tony, who appeared in the film "Idle on Parade" as "Jeep Jackson", a rock'n'roller,
sang for the first time; he put it over very well indeed, the proof—"I've Waited So Long" and an E.P. from the movie both crashed the charts
well done, Tony Newley.
Billy Fury, l7-year-old from Liverpool, wrote a song called "Maybe Tomorrow". So far most of the rockers have been southerners—Billy shows
us that the northerners are just as good. "Maybe Tomorrow" is I think one of the best songs yet this year.
American Eddie Cochran, although new to Britain, has been in the business some time. If you saw that wow of a movie "The Girl Can't Help It",
you may remember Eddie singing "20 Flight Rock". After a long silence he rocked the U.S. and British charts with "Summertime Blues", and a
dynamic follow-up with "C'mon Everybody"; now he is a firmly established disc idol!
From the United States to Cheshunt, Herts., and Cliff Richard, the nearest British threat to Elvis Presley yet, this 18-year-old Cheshunt clerk,
soared to overnight fame with "Move It", a real solid beat number that knocked the record buyers cold! Reaching number two place is no mean
feat for a first attempt. Mr. Richard has not failed yet—I don't think he will.
What about Mr. "Rock 'n1 Roll"—G.I. Elvis Presley?_at the time of writing he is now at the top with a double-sided hit, "I Need Your Love
Tonight" and "A Fool such as I", although advance orders did not rate as high as his previous hit "I Got Stung", the Presley phenomenon still
exists. Elvis went right into number four bracket—"The Pelvis" is here to stay!
Country music is rapidly becoming a firm favourite, skiffle groups have now taken up the easy going rhythm, and among the exponents of C
and W, standing out is Johnny Cash, 26-year-old "cry in your coffee" cowboy, a firm favourite although he has never hit high places this side,
in the U.S. he is the most. A style of his own, and no gimmicks, is this boy's key to success. If you do want a GOOD record, you must hear
Johnny Cash's "The Nearest Thing to Heaven" on the London label.
Britain's own "Irish Hillbilly" is the title Americans gave Lonnie Donegan. He has been around some time, but ever since the recording of
"Rock Island Line" became a hit in 1955, Lonnie became a top rate recording star. It was he who started the fantastic "skiffle" craze. Lonnie
followed up I one hit after the other. He has always appeared in the charts, and, his latest, "Fort Worth Jail" looks like another top record for the
"King of Skiffle".
The greatest musical craze is still with ,us, and I believe that it will not pass, not until another form of "beat" music becomes, in the eyes of the
younger generation, a worthy successor to the Rock.
As long as teenagers, etc., dance the way they do (and have done since the 40s—believe it or not) we will see no great change. In the '40s the
American troops who came here brought with them Jive, and this later was called Jitterbug, although this was a craze and stayed from 1946 to
1948, it was succeeded by Bop which in turn was taken over by Rock 'n' Roll, so you see, a different name but the dance routine only slightly
varied, and all the time a wild beat in the background. Rock 'n' roll has become as accepted to the general public as frozen food (a great novelty
some years ago); it has changed since the early days and although there are sometimes riots, etc., these are becoming extremely rare.
So there it is—you have to face it, square or cat, the Rock has not budged. Next term I'll tell you more about the records in general, of the artists
and of the idols the next eight months are bound to push into the limelight of records, films, and T.V—Dig you later?
"BOPPER"
The Pest and Disease Headache
Those who grow fruit, vegetables and flowers, will know how hard it is to keep their crops clean and free from pest and diseases. Certain of these
seem to reappear year after year even though to all appearances they were exterminated the year before. How severe the attack may be varies
from year to year, according to the weather, but still they come.
Let us first, however, differentiate between the two; "pests" are insect pests and "diseases" are caused by fungi or plant virus One does not
have to be a skilled plant doctor, however, to deal with these everyday troubles, anymore than it is necessary to be a skilled doctor to tackle
complaints such as colds and chills.
Many ailments of our plants, of course are not due to infection at all, but are purely physiological causes such as water logging and draught and
faulty nutrition, and these we call "functional disorders". In the following few lines mention will be made of the principal pests and disease!
which we may encounter so that we can deal with them easily and speedely
Many of the birds we see do nothing but good in the garden, but unfortunately a few are harmful, especially the sparrow, pigeon and finch
Families, but damage can be prevented by simply spraying a solution of alum or quassia.
The ant again is to familiar to need description but can be just as great a nuisance in the garden. The nest is best sought out the lawn or border,
or from under paving slabs and a solution of carbon bisulphide poured into each nest . A proprietary antkiller is "Nippon".

Page Compiled January 2020

All images and text copyright © to Goldings Old Boys reunion members

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